Is compounding legal? Is it safe?

Compounding has been part of healthcare since the origins of pharmacy, and is used widely today in all areas of the industry, from hospitals to nuclear medicine. Over the last decade, compounding resurgence has largely benefited form advances in technology, quality control and research methodology. The Food and Drug Administration has stated that compounded prescriptions are both ethical and legal as long as they are prescribed by a licensed practitioner for a specific patient and compounded by a licensed pharmacy. In addition, compounding is regulated by state boards of pharmacy.

How does compounding benefit me?

Many patients are allergic to preservatives or dyes, or are sensitive to standard drug strengths. With a physician's consent, a compounding pharmacist can change the strength of a medication, alter its form to make it easier for the patient to ingest, or add flavor to it to make it more palatable. The pharmacist also can prepare the medication using several unique delivery systems, such as a sublingual troche or lozenge, a lollipop or a transdermal gel. Patients who are having a difficult time swallowing a capsule, a compounding pharmacist can make a suspension instead.

What kinds of prescriptions can be compounded?

Almost any kind. Compounded prescriptions are ideal for any patient requiring unique dosages and/or delivery devices, which can take the form of solutions, suppositories, sprays, oral rinses, lollipops and even as transdermal sticks.

Compounding applications can include: Compounded Hormone Replacement Therapy, Veterinary, Hospice, Pediatric, Dental, Dermatology, Medication, Flavoring, Chronic Pain Management, Neuropathy, Sports Medicine, Infertility, Wound Therapy, Podiatry and Gastroenterology
 

We are unable to do sterile compounding, injecting or eye drops.